Winter Climbng Gear Update: Petzl and Salewa Ice Screws

Ice Screws:

Salewa Quick Screw and Petzl Laser Speed Light

The winter of 2014-15 was something of a disappointment for those of us living in the Mountain West.  Temperatures were warm.  Precipitation was scarce, and often fell in the form of rain instead of snow.  Here in Utah, the ice climbing season was short and inconsistent.   As a result, I only got out for a couple of days locally, and took a couple of trips down to Ouray, which also was suffering through a relatively warm winter.

I did get to try out some new ice screws by Salewa, and also got to use my aluminum Petzl Speed Light screws a bit more.  Here are my impressions:

The Salewa Quick Screw is a screw that incorporates a number of interesting features.  It has a compact head with a fold out crank.  The head is some sort of composite that supposedly makes the screw less prone to melting out when placed in direct sunlight.  The most unusual feature of the Salewa Quck Screw is that it comes with an integral racking system.  The screw is permanently attached to a quick draw via a sliding hanger, and the quick draw attaches to the screw by means of a plastic clip.  This makes them very easy to carry.  There is no need for racking on a separate biner, caritool, etc.   Biners and screws are color coded by length.

Salewa Quick Screws

The racking system is very convenient, however, it does require a few extra steps when placing the screw one-handed on steep ice.  Here is the sequence:

1:  You grab the carabiner that the screw is racked with.   you’ve got hold of the carabiner, but the screw is still clipped into the plastic carrier, and the head of the screw is dangling down.

2:  While grasping the carabiner, you use the heel of your palm to whack the screw up against your body (or the ice) to break the grip of the plastic carrier and release the screw body.

3:  You’re still holding the carabiner, but you really need to be grasping the head of the screw.  So, you give it a little jerk, and let the hanger slide up towards the head, so that gravity helps the screw get oriented correctly.  Then you work your hand up onto the head of the screw.  (This can be a bit tricky wearing gloves and worrying about fighting a pump with big air beneath you.)

4:  Once you’re grasping the head of the screw, you punch it into the ice and start turning it in.  When the teeth catch, you deploy the crank handle and crank it in.

5:  Clip your rope into the biner, and you’re good.

Once you are grabbing the head, the screw goes in very nicely.  It bites as well as any other screw I’ve used, and the shape of the head makes it very easy to get pressure on the screw when you’re starting it.  However, moving your hand grip from the biner to the head (step 3 above) can be a bit tricky, and certainly requires more dexterity than placing a normal screw because when you remove a normal screw from your rack, you’re already grasping it by its head.

I bought 4 of the Salewa screws.  I think that’s all I’m going to buy.  They are nicely made, and I will probably carry a couple of them on most climbs because they rack so easy with their integral biners and don’t take up space on my caritool.  The long size in particular is a great option as I can use it for V-Threads and not have to worry about racking it.     However, the fiddly nature of the sequence of placing them one handed means that I’m always going to want to have some more traditional screws with me for steep panic placements.

Petzl Laser Speed Light Aluminum Ice Screw

Last fall, I posted my first impressions of the aluminum Laser Speed Light screw HERE.

After using them climbing water ice this winter, my first impressions have been mostly confirmed.   I love the light weight, and their aggressive teeth make starting them very very easy.  Although I bought them primarily as a light weight alpine ice screw, I find that I’m using them as a go-to all around water ice screw as well.

However, the binding issues I encountered when I first used the screws have continued to occur.  These screws tend to freeze into the ice when placing them in temperatures near freezing.  Colder temperatures seem to result in less freezing/binding.  I have seen other people posting on the internet with similar experiences, so my conclusion is that this is not my imagination, but is something inherent in the aluminum design (probably related to aluminum’s conductivity.)

The bottom line, however, is that the binding/freezing issue is relatively minor when compared with the excellent traits of these screws.  Their light weight and high performance have earned them a place on my climbing rack both for water ice and alpine ice.

Petzl Laser Speed Light Ice Screws: First Impressions

I recently bought some of the new Petzl Laser Speed Light ice screws.  The Speed Light screw is one of two screws on the market that is constructed with aluminum.  (The other aluminum screw is the E-Climb Klau screw which I reviewed previously HERE.)

I have not yet had a chance to thoroughly test the Petzl Speed Light screws, however I have taken them on one alpine ice route (Mount Helen’s Tower 1 Gully in the Wind River Range.)

Based on this initial use, these are my first impressions of the Petzl screw.  I will update this post when I get more opportunities to use these screws and have enough data to provide a more thorough review.

Petzl Laser Speed Light on right, E-Climb Klau on the left

Petzl Laser Speed Light on right, E-Climb Klau on the left

Construction:
The  Speed Light is made mostly from aluminum.  The body and hanger are aluminum.  The teeth and the crank handle are steel.  The crank is a fold-out handle that provides extra leverage when turning the screw into the ice.

Weight:
Light weight is the primary benefit of an aluminum bodied screw.  The Petzl Laser Speed Light is significantly lighter than a steel screw, and is also a little lighter than the E-Climb Klau aluminum screw.

Weights for the Petzl Speed Lights are as follows:

13cm  3.1 ounces

17cm  3.5 ounces

21cm  3.8 ounces

Some other screw weights for comparison:

19 cm Black Diamond screw  5.7 ounces;

22cm Black Diamond screw  6.2 ounces

16 cm Grivel 360 screw   6.2 ounces

14 cm E-Climb Klau aluminum screw 4 ounces

18 cm E-Climb Klau aluminum screw 4.4 ounces

22 cm E-Climb Klau aluminum screw  4.7 ounces

The Petzl Speed light achieves this low weight because most of the screw is made from aluminum, including the tube body and the hanger.  The E-Climb Klau incorporates an aluminum tube, but the hanger is constructed from steel.   On the Petzl, only the teeth and crank handle are steel.

Laser Speed Light has aluminum body, steel teeth

Laser Speed Light has aluminum body, steel teeth


Ergonomics and Placement

The Speed Light racks well.  The screws have hangers that nest neatly on the ice clipper and don’t get tangled or fouled up easily.

The teeth are aggressive, and the Speed Light starts easily.  In my use, they seemed to start about as well as the E-Climb Klau, but the ice we were climbing on was relatively soft and warm, so I can’t really say which might be better, as most any screw will start easily in softer ice.  I will need to wait until I encounter harder colder ice conditions before I will be able to do a real evaluation of how easily the screw bites and starts compared with its competitors.

One negative thing I did notice when using the Laser Speed Light was that it had a tendency to bind up and become quite difficult to turn on occasion.  This happened constantly on the alpine ice route I was using them on.  I would start the Speed Light, begin cranking, and then, rather suddenly, the screw would become very difficult to turn.  The first time this happened, I wondered if I had hit a rock.  Given the depth of the ice, however, I determined that this was unlikely, and decided to just keep cranking.  After a fair amount of effort, the screw began to turn normally again.  This was a common occurrence with the Petzl Speed Light screws, with the “binding” occuring once or twice with just about every Petzl screw I placed. My partner also experienced the same binding as I did.

I’m not sure why this happened, but my speculation is that the ice core was melting and then re-freezing in the tube.    Temperatures we were climbing in were hovering right around freezing, and it’s possible that the friction of placing the screw was causing slight melting of the ice core, and then it was freezing up again, creating blockage.  Aluminum conducts changes in temperature more readily than steel, which may contribute to this effect.

I have noticed that when using aluminum screws, (both Petzl and the E-Climb screws) it is generally a bit harder to clear the core from the tube than when using a steel screw, which seems to support this theory.  However, I really don’t have anything else to support this belief or otherwise explain this behavior of the screws.  I also don’t even know if this is going to be common when using the Speed Light, or if this “binding up”  was just the result of an unusual combination of ice conditions and temperature.   I should note, however, that I did not experience any similar binding when using the aluminum E-Climb Klau screws.

At this point, I’m not sure what to make of this experience.  I need more use of the Laser Speed Light in a variety of conditions to determine how much of a factor this will be.  At any rate, the screws were still usable, they just require significant effort to get them started again once they bind up.

Initial Conclusions:

I don’t have enough uses of these screws across broad conditions to come to final conclusions, but based on my initial use, I think that these screws will find a place on my alpine climbing rack when weight is at a premium.  They start easily, rack easily, and weigh significantly less than steel screws.  There is the issue of binding up when driving them home, but my suspicion is that the binding issue is likely limited to specific temperature and ice combinations, and won’t be a universal problem.

I am looking forward to using them more.

UPDATE:    My updated conclusions after using these screws a bit more can be found HERE.

 

E Climb Klau Aluminum Ice Screws

The E-Climb “Klau” ice screw is not widely available in the United States.  As of this date, I couldn’t find a single U.S. seller.  I ended up ordering the screws directly from Spain, where E-Climb is headquartered.  E-Climb Website HERE  The E-Climb Klau screw has a couple of features that make it different from most other screws on the market.  It has an aluminum body, and removable/replaceable steel teeth.

E-Climb Klau Ice Screw

The aluminum tube body makes the Klau screws marginally lighter than all-steel screws.  This is a nice feature for gram-shaving alpine climbers who obsess over gear weight.

Some weight comparisons:

19 cm Black Diamond screw  5.7 ounces;   22cm Black Diamond screw  6.2 ounces

16 cm Grivel 360 screw   6.2 ounces

14 cm Klau screw 4 ounces; 18 cm Klau screw 4.4 ounces; 22 cm Klau  4.7 ounces

The per screw weight savings aren’t really huge.  Average savings of less than 2 ounces per screw.  However, with a 10-12 screw rack, you could save about a pound or more with aluminum Klau screws compared with traditional steel screws.  For weight obsessed climbers, a pound of savings may well be worth it.

The teeth of the screws are steel, and can be replaced if they are damaged.  Changing out teeth is pretty easy.  You just screw off the teeth, using the crank handle of another screw as a wrench.  The replacement teeth then just screw back on.  The replacement has some dry adhesive (think  “loctite”) on them to keep them from unscrewing when they’re not supposed to.  Replacement teeth are about $13.  The instructions for the screws say that conventional sharpening can mess up the interchangeable facility of the screws. I don’t think that a little touch-up with a file here and there would ruin it, if you stayed away from the little threads that secure the teeth to the tube.

Replaceable tips/teeth for E-Climb Klau screws

The most important characteristic of an ice screw for me is how quickly and easily it can be placed.  The Klau is comparable to other modern screws in ease of placement.  It bites into the ice and gets started just as easily (maybe a little bit easier even) compared with my Black Diamond screws.  Starting them seemed about the same as my Grivel 360 screw.  I could place a Klau screw with my left hand, which is a good test, as I am pretty clumsy with my left hand.  The folding crank gives good leverage for turning it into hard ice.  The crank doesn’t have much up and down wiggle room, however, so on featured ice, you will need to chop away lumps and bumps that impede rotation of the crank, as there is very limited ability to maneuver the crank over such obstacles.   In my completely non-scientific tests of these screws, they do seem to be slightly more difficult than steel screws when trying to clear ice out of the tube after use.

screw-1

E-Climb Klau (left) and BD screw (right)

The threads on the E-Climb screws are not quite as tall as the threads on other screws in my arsenal.  I have no idea what effect this difference might have on holding power.  However, I think that I might place the screws in a more horizontal position compared with the slightly down-facing position of other screws with larger threads.

Overall,  I like the Klau screws.  I like their light weight, and they place easily in hard ice.  I don’t think that they will replace my steel screws for every day ice cragging, but for alpine climbs where weight is an issue, I will definitely use the Klau screws to lighten my load.